Transgender mixed martial artist who belonged to the US Army Special Forces debuts – Texasnewstoday.com

Category:
Icon 0
Icon 10월 18, 2021

The second openly transgender MMA fighter in the United States won her debut, rekindling the debate over transgender women in sports.
Alana McLaughlin, 38, won her first professional fight against Celine Provost in Friday’s Convert Global Qualifying and ended the match naked choke 3 minutes and 32 seconds after the second round.
Originally from South Carolina, McLaughlin began the transition in 2010 after spending six years in the US Army Special Forces.
She is the second openly transgender athlete to fight MMA professionally in the United States, following Fallon Fox, who made her debut in 2012 and made history and retired in 2014.
“I want to pick up the cloak that Fallon dropped,” she told Outsport.

In the match on Friday, McLaugh Inn became the second openly transgender female athlete to compete professionally in MMA in the United States.
McLaughlin defeats Provost in the second round with a rear-naked choke
McLaughlin defeats Provost in the second round with a rear-naked choke
Trans MMA fighter Alana McLaughlin (pictured) won her debut MMA match against Celine Provost on Friday, causing online criticism of trans women in sports.
Trans MMA fighter Alana McLaughlin (pictured) won her debut MMA match against Celine Provost on Friday, causing online criticism of trans women in sports.
Ryan-born Alana McLaughlin began her transition in 2010 after leaving the U.S. Army Special Forces.
Alana McLaughling
Ryan-born McLaughlin began her transition in 2010 after leaving the U.S. Army Special Forces.
“Now I’m following in the footsteps of Fallon. I’m just one step on the road. I’m very much looking forward to more behind me.”
Fox was watching the ringside of the match on Friday, ESPN reported.
McLaughlin had been training for over a year to prepare for the match, she told the outlet, and although it was originally scheduled for August, Provost tested positive for the coronavirus. It was postponed.
Ryan-born McLaughlin has cleared a hormone panel issued by the Florida Boxing Commission, but said finding a fighting opponent is a “nightmare.”
“I just respect [Provost]”She told ESPN.
However, many on social media have stated that McLaughlin’s victory is an example of an unjustified promotion of transgender women to participate in sports.
“Alana McLaughlin moved five years ago, which means that’she’lived as a man for 33 years,” writes martial arts podcaster Angel David Castro.
“Tonight, McLaughlin fought and beat a biological woman … what a shock!”
MMA commentator @SafeBetMMA wrote:
McLaughlin has been training for more than a year in preparation for the match and said finding an opponent is a
Alana McLaughlin
McLaughlin has been training for more than a year in preparation for the match and said finding an opponent is a “nightmare.”
“I think this is okay and will it empower transgender?”
‘I respect transgender rights. But how is this seriously fair? I wrote another commentator on Twitter.
“I respect transgender rights all day long, but this is an unfair advantage,” another post said.
“Another headline:’Man cheats,’” Blaze writer Jessica O’Donnell posted in a reply to a New York Post article about victory.




Much of the social media commented on the match, saying that it is unfair for transgender women to compete with other women in sports.
Much of the social media commented on the match, saying that it is unfair for transgender women to compete with other women in sports.
Others in the feminist world saw the match as an example of abuse.
“Men’s Violence Against Women as a Public Sport? #NoThankYou” posted Genevieve Gluck, a contributor to the Canadian feminist website Feminist Current.
Many agreed.
‘Wow. I couldn’t foresee the day when men would praise women for beating, “he read. “What a surprisingly brave new world.”
“This is disgusting and dangerous,” says another post.
Others even said that the match constitutes male-female violence
Others even said that the match constitutes male-female violence
But others have blessed more.
You did something amazing, “tweet Jessica Darling, a reporter for the Young Journalism Initiative. “They are just crazy sports, not just the Sith people.”
“I support you very much, and I hope you don’t mind the horrifying biased comments. You’re great,” wrote another Twitter user.
“Both did great things there!” Another responded.
“You are wonderful, don’t let hatred disappoint you,” another replied.
“Athletes like you make history. Just as we look back at people who wanted to ban integrated sports, we look back at how people react to you one day.



But others were more supportive of McLaughlin
But others were more supportive of McLaughlin
In the backlash, McLaughlin told his fans that she didn’t need to protect her.
“Don’t feel obliged to protect me from transphobia online,” she tweeted. “We all know that they are not discussing in good faith and your energy is being used better elsewhere.”
In anticipation of pushback, McLaughlin told outsports before the match that her participation was another step in making more transgender people participate in and visible in the sport. ..
“If you want to see more transgender athletes, and if you want to see more opportunities for transgender children, you have to step into those spaces and make it happen,” she said. “It’s time for transgender people to join the sport and become more normal.”
Transgender mixed martial artist who belonged to the US Army Special Forces debuts
Source link Transgender mixed martial artist who belonged to the US Army Special Forces debuts

source

답글 남기기

이메일 주소는 공개되지 않습니다. 필수 항목은 *(으)로 표시합니다